Noordin laptop videos show bomb planning

Indonesian police have released a series of files from slain terror leader Noordin Mohammed Top’s laptop showing detailed and chillingly nonchalant planning behind the July bombings in Jakarta.

南宁桑拿

Videos on the computer seized in the Central Java raid this month that killed Noordin, 41, show suicide bombers and other militants discussing and making preparations for the July 17 attacks, which killed seven people.

In one video, the two suicide bombers, Dani Dwi Permana, 18, and Nana Ikhwan Maulana, 28, are seen doing stretches near an empty lot in front of the targeted JW Marriott and Ritz-Carlton hotels.

In another video, the bombers and hotel florist Ibrohim — who police say helped stage the attack from the inside — picnic on biscuits and apples on the grass in front of the hotels.

Syaifudin Jaelani, a fourth militant still on the run from police, says off camera: “America, destroyed; Australia, destroyed; Indonesia, destroyed.”

In yet another clip, teenage bomber Dani is seen in front of the hotels saying: “This is not suicide, this is a good deed.”

“We see how they are preparing themselves, how they have filmed their plans and their surveys of targets through their own eyes,” police spokesman Nanan Soekarna told reporters.

“We see how they really did prepare themselves, that this isn’t just something the police have been saying.”

“We found the laptop on Noordin’s back,” he said.

Other files found on Noordin’s laptop included videos showing shopping and discussions of the impending attacks, as well as letters by Jaelani intended for his family that describe the operation’s organisational structure.

“We’re an organisation with efficient leadership, there are administrators, those who manage funding… those who look after the families of holy warriors, those who find transport, look for explosives, look for weapons, handle internal and overseas affairs,” Jaelani wrote.

Detective Tito Karnavian said police still regard the network Noordin built as a potent threat despite his death.

“This network has the capability to build new cells — for example, Syaifudin’s (Jaelani’s) cell, which has not been destroyed yet,” Karnavian said.

“The targets previously were the far enemy (such as the United States and Australia) but now they are also targeting the Indonesian government which they say is promoting democracy, which is being pushed by the West,” he said.

Noordin, a Malaysian who headed a violent splinter faction of the radical Jemaah Islamiyah network, was killed along with three of his militants during a September 17 raid on a village house outside Solo city.

Noordin headed an organisation he dubbed “Al-Qaeda in the Malay Archipelago” and was one of Asia’s most wanted men for allegedly masterminding attacks including a 2003 bombing of the Marriott that killed 12 people.

He was also wanted for the 2004 bombing of the Australian embassy in Jakarta and 2005 attacks on tourist restaurants on the holiday island of Bali.

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